New mural installed at Chattanooga WorkSpace

An artist’s new mural on Sixth Street is the perfect photo opportunity for locals and tourists visiting the Scenic City.

Kenny Kudulis unveiled his “Chattanooga” mural during an open studio night at Chattanooga WorkSpace last Friday. Instead of using visual representations of the city—such as his recent mural at 2 Sons Kitchen & Market—Kudulis used graphic text to highlight iconic Chattanooga locations.

The idea for this version came from his travels. Kudulis and his wife, Jenifer, spend most of their year traveling to art festivals in major cities.

“In most of those cities, there is usually an awesome and colorful mural that represents that specific city,” he said. “It’s a great spot for locals and tourists alike to take their pics and have a visual representation of the place they are currently inhabiting … something to look cool in front of and share with friends. I wanted that for Chattanooga.”

Locals and tourists will recognize Rock City, the Chattanooga Choo-Choo and an orange version of the word “Tennessee” to represent the Volunteers.

“Who doesn’t love Rock City?” he said. “And the Choo-Choo seems to be the first thing people mention when I tell them I’m from Chattanooga. That song is the fabric of the American consciousness.”

Kudulis also highlights Chattanooga’s nickname—the Scenic City—and offers a tribute to our area code.

“The ‘423’ is hometown pride,” he said. “We moved from New York City two years ago and love it here in Chattanooga. We live in the Southside and love how walkable it is and how fast it’s growing.”

More of Kudulis’ work is available here.

The mural is located at 302 W. Sixth St. in downtown Chattanooga.

Chattanooga WorkSpace hosts an open studio night the first Friday of each month. The next gathering will be Sept. 1.

Click here for more information.

This story was originally published on nooga.com

Chattanooga Artist Makes International Waves With Public Art Installations

Konstantin Dimopoulos is an internationally-recognized, Chattanooga-based artist and activist whose public installations, sculptures, and 2D work are created for raising awareness for environmental issues (such as ecocide of forests) and the country’s problem with homelessness.

Mr. Dimopoulos is back in the South after a trip to Denver, Co. where he created his well-recognized “The Blue Trees,” a publicly immersive installation. This would mark the 20th city Mr. Dimopoulos has impacted with his work. Other works include “The Purple Rain”, which compares the increase in homelessness to a downpour, and “The Barbed Wire Buddha,” demonstrating a juxtaposition of materialism and faith.

Mr. Dimopoulos and his family were exiled from his home country at an early age. This forced emigration affected him tremendously, leading him to travel the world for decades before settling down in Chattanooga.

More can be found on his website.

This story was originally published on The Chattanoogan

Bela Begonias

Bethany is the artist, designer, maker and owner behind Bela Begonias.  She was born into the Appalachian mountainside of eastern Tennessee, and later immersed in the vibrant culture of Asheville, North Carolina before finding her way to Nashville. Her art is an organic reflection of the mountainous landscapes from which she came, heavily influenced by nature, earth tones, the beach and ocean, the southwest and countless other wonders this incredible world creates.  She is a walking wanderlust, having spent years exploring the world at each opportunity given.   Although she studied art, design and fashion in college, the courage to “be an artist” seemed unrealistic upon entering “the real world.”  After a decade of feeling like a round peg trying to fit into a square hole, in 2015, Bethany (with the undying support and true belief in skill from her loving husband) finally took her vision, studies, travels, ethos and experience and cultivated it into a single leap-of-faith that is now Bela Begonias.

The beginning was a humble one.  Tucked into the attic, the only space available in their tiny East Nashville cottage, Bethany set up a makeshift shop and… started MAKING!  She was terrified of failure, of putting her heart and soul out into the world and of the simple fact that there would no longer be a salaried paycheck showing up in the bank account every other Friday.  Some days were highs and some days were lows.  Some days are still highs… creating a new design that is inspired and satisfying… and some days are still lows… a vision not quite developing as intended or how overwhelming it can be to keep a thumb on every aspect of moving a business forward.

Bela Begonias is rounding the one year corner; in looking back on the launch of the website, the acceptance and success at several shows, being carried at three local Nashville stores, the growing support from the public and the continued encouragement from her family and friends… Bela Begonias is reeling and hopeful about what the future can bring!

Purchasing a piece of Bela Begonias jewelry or ceramic art is an investment in quality.  If you know Bethany, at some point or another you’ve likely heard one of her quips… “quality over quantity” or “form must follow function” or maybe “waste not want not.”  Cliche? Maybe… True? Absolutely.  Bela Begonias stands firm on the idea that your jewelry will last for years and your ceramic piece might be passed down to your child.  Quality IS more important than quantity.  Each piece is created with care, precision and a perfectionist’s eye.  The materials used have been tried and tested.

Lastly, Bela Begonias want’s to express a world of gratitude to you, the customer, for seeking unique and artful design. “Thank you for supporting the entire artist community and for passing your experience and BB finds along to your friends and family!”

Take a moment, if you will, and follow Bela Begonias on Instagram @bela_begonias, Facebook and Twitter @belabegonias

 

Hunter Museum again inspires WorkSpace artists

Local artist Lisa Denney is a painter who also designs rugs. As one of the 18 participating artists in “Inspired II: WorkSpace Artists Inspired by the Hunter Museum of American Art Collection,” she merged the two mediums to create a textile wall hanging.

She actually also incorporated photography into her piece. Denney chose a painting called “Rosy Morning” from the Hunter’s collection. She says it reminded her of a photograph she had taken of her backyard garden.

“I wove my piece and also used some paper clay to give it some dimension,” she says. “I used the imagery from my backyard but also the color palette from ‘Rosy Morning.'”

This is the second year of the Inspired project. WorkSpace artists are asked to peruse the Hunter’s permanent collection in search of a piece that will inspire them to create something entirely new. A reception was held on May 5 at Chattanooga WorkSpace, and the pieces will remain in the main gallery there through the end of the month. They include paintings, textiles, photographs and mixed media.

The pieces may be viewed during the week, but WorkSpace is also hosting a free Makers Social on the Patio on Friday from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Visitors can tour the entire space, including the main gallery, where the Inspired pieces are, and the artists’ studios.

For “Inspired II,” many of the artists used the opportunity to challenge themselves by not only using another art piece as inspiration but also by working in a medium they’d never worked in before.

Janet Campbell Bradley chose the museum’s fence, which was designed by artist Albert Paley, as her inspiration. It was originally installed in 1975 to connect the old mansion with the then-new addition. The fence’s designer had preciously worked in jewelry, which is Bradley’s normal medium. For the project, she created a triptych using printmaking, something she’d never done.

“These are done through a printing press where you actually paint the ink onto a template, and you roll that onto a printing press with paper,” she says.

She also incorporated sections of a map of the Tennessee River from 1974.

Photographer Jenny Shugart also created a triptych, basing hers on Gordon Parks’ 1942 piece “American Gothic, Washington D.C.” Instead of holding a pitchfork like the white couple in Grant Wood’s “American Gothic,” the African-American woman in the print is flanked by a mop and broom.

Shugart’s piece centers on an old magazine ad she’d saved from the ’90s featuring a young girl under text that reads: “She’s good — for a girl,” with “for a girl” marked through.

She says the project was fun, inspiring, scary “and a few more things thrown in.”

“It was fun to be able to go over to the Hunter. If you haven’t been over there, go. It’s a real gem for the city.”

For his piece, muralist Kevin Bate incorporated live video, video screen and a large painting he based on the “Ruth Gleaning” statue by Randolph Rogers. During the May 5 reception, the painting was on the second floor and shown to viewers remotely via the video feed.

This story was originally in the Times Free Press. Written by Barry Courter. 

The South American Art Of Mercedes Llanos

By: Tony Mraz   April 12, 2017

This story was originally published on chattanoogapulse.com