Category Archives: Mentions & Coverage

Hunter Museum again inspires WorkSpace artists

Local artist Lisa Denney is a painter who also designs rugs. As one of the 18 participating artists in “Inspired II: WorkSpace Artists Inspired by the Hunter Museum of American Art Collection,” she merged the two mediums to create a textile wall hanging.

She actually also incorporated photography into her piece. Denney chose a painting called “Rosy Morning” from the Hunter’s collection. She says it reminded her of a photograph she had taken of her backyard garden.

“I wove my piece and also used some paper clay to give it some dimension,” she says. “I used the imagery from my backyard but also the color palette from ‘Rosy Morning.'”

This is the second year of the Inspired project. WorkSpace artists are asked to peruse the Hunter’s permanent collection in search of a piece that will inspire them to create something entirely new. A reception was held on May 5 at Chattanooga WorkSpace, and the pieces will remain in the main gallery there through the end of the month. They include paintings, textiles, photographs and mixed media.

The pieces may be viewed during the week, but WorkSpace is also hosting a free Makers Social on the Patio on Friday from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Visitors can tour the entire space, including the main gallery, where the Inspired pieces are, and the artists’ studios.

For “Inspired II,” many of the artists used the opportunity to challenge themselves by not only using another art piece as inspiration but also by working in a medium they’d never worked in before.

Janet Campbell Bradley chose the museum’s fence, which was designed by artist Albert Paley, as her inspiration. It was originally installed in 1975 to connect the old mansion with the then-new addition. The fence’s designer had preciously worked in jewelry, which is Bradley’s normal medium. For the project, she created a triptych using printmaking, something she’d never done.

“These are done through a printing press where you actually paint the ink onto a template, and you roll that onto a printing press with paper,” she says.

She also incorporated sections of a map of the Tennessee River from 1974.

Photographer Jenny Shugart also created a triptych, basing hers on Gordon Parks’ 1942 piece “American Gothic, Washington D.C.” Instead of holding a pitchfork like the white couple in Grant Wood’s “American Gothic,” the African-American woman in the print is flanked by a mop and broom.

Shugart’s piece centers on an old magazine ad she’d saved from the ’90s featuring a young girl under text that reads: “She’s good — for a girl,” with “for a girl” marked through.

She says the project was fun, inspiring, scary “and a few more things thrown in.”

“It was fun to be able to go over to the Hunter. If you haven’t been over there, go. It’s a real gem for the city.”

For his piece, muralist Kevin Bate incorporated live video, video screen and a large painting he based on the “Ruth Gleaning” statue by Randolph Rogers. During the May 5 reception, the painting was on the second floor and shown to viewers remotely via the video feed.

This story was originally in the Times Free Press. Written by Barry Courter. 

The South American Art Of Mercedes Llanos

By: Tony Mraz   April 12, 2017

This story was originally published on chattanoogapulse.com

New Art Collection Now On Display At Erlanger Baroness Hospital

Erlanger Health System presents Hope Springs, “A collection of paintings that bring a sense of hope and new life,” as the fourth installment by the Arts at Erlanger program.

The Hope Springs collection features five female artists from around the region; Ellyn Bivin, Hollie Berry, Angela Serre, Helen Jones, and Ali Kay. Light and airy images dominate the exhibit with a variety of landscapes, subjects and scenes.

Bivin is a Chattanooga native with a lifelong passion for art. She received her degree in Art Education and Printmaking from Virginia Commonwealth University and attended University of Tennessee Chattanooga graduate school, focusing on combining old world etching with contemporary panting for a one-of-a-kind printmaking technique. Her four-legged friends and images from turn of the century photographs are a few of her favorite subjects.

Berry, a native Texan, has pursued art from the time she could grasp a pencil. She holds a Bachelors of Fine Arts in Studio Art from the University of Texas at Austin. A few years later she moved to Chattanooga, where she found fresh inspiration. First, she created Dewdles, monumental land art drawings in the dewy lawn of Coolidge Park. These temporal works paved the way for more permanent opportunities like her first mural for the McCallie Walls Mural Project, Four Horsewomen, and collaborating with her engineer husband, Rudy Elizondo, on an interactive art installation of flying books installed in the Chattanooga Public Library. In 2015, she apprenticed under world renowned muralist Meg Saligman on the 40,000 sq. ft. Chattanooga mural We Shall Not Be Satisfied Until.

Bright and airy artwork lines the gallery corridor at Erlanger Baroness Campus.

Southern charm and exaggerated realisms describe Serre’s personality and style. Influenced as a child by her grandmother’s talent and a book by watercolor artist Herb Olsen; her passion for art lead to a formal education at the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Fla. While years as a graphic designer in corporate America provided success, her love of painting continued with works spanning the globe. Her paintings and portraits are in private collections throughout the US and Europe.  Serre’s inspiration derives from her travels, family and photos.

Jones’ love of nature began with her Indiana childhood, in a yard filled with flowers, fruit trees, grape vines and birds. A graduate of Indiana State University with a Bachelor of Science degree, Jones had only four watercolor lessons while living in Atlanta, GA in 1984. Celebrities, banks, corporations, hospitals, designers and homeowners began commissioning her art that is inspired by her travels to the Greek islands, France, Canada, western states and the Caribbean. An extraordinarily versatile and detailed artist, Jones’ mediums are watercolor, oil, acrylic, ink, charcoal and pencil. Her subjects vary from florals and wildlife to wall murals and automobiles.

Art has been Kay’s passion since childhood.   She grew up in West Bend, Wisconsin, and founded her decorative painting company, Positive Space, in 2002 shortly after finishing high school at the age of 19.   She studied fine art at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee while simultaneously growing her mural and faux finishing business.   After spending several years working with designers and architects creating unique interior spaces in Houston, TX, she settled in Chattanooga in 2013. She opened the new Positive Space Decorative Painting Studio at Chattanooga WorkSpace.   Kay’s portfolio is vast including commission work in many different styles.   She continues to create large scale murals, custom fine art and wall finishes while adding teaching to her list of services. Her work can be seen locally throughout Chattanooga as well as in the homes and businesses of her clients throughout the country.

The purpose of art in the hospital setting goes far beyond decoration. Recent studies show a direct link between art and the brain’s reaction to pain, stress and anxiety. A 2011 University of London study found that blood flow increased 10 percent to the “joy response” part of the brain when subjects saw a beautiful painting. The Arts at Erlanger program seeks to preserve and expand the healing, uplifting, and therapeutic art at all campuses in our medical system.

This story was originally published on Chattanoogan.com.

 

LAUNCH Business Entrepreneurship Academy open for sign-ups

Picture this: You’re taking your morning shower, and all of a sudden, a brilliant business idea pops into your mind. But you don’t have any experience in entrepreneurship, and you definitely don’t know how to make the vision a reality.

Local nonprofit LAUNCH can help.

The local organization that aims to empower community members through entrepreneurship, job training and mentorship is starting another session of its Business Entrepreneurship Academy.

The academy is a 10-week class that teaches budding entrepreneurs how to start their own businesses.

There are multiple class locations around Chattanooga, and classes start Sept. 14. It costs $100 to participate, according to LAUNCH’s website.

Click here for more information about the academy or to sign up.

Local entrepreneur and inventor Felicia Jackson recently went through the LAUNCH class. She’s created a product called CPR Lifewrap, which is a disposable plastic sleeve that covers the torso of a person in need of CPR.

It has a mouth barrier—which guards against bodily fluids that can be exchanged during mouth to mouth—and an outline that shows the user where to place hands for proper CPR execution. It also has simple instructions embossed on the product.

The LAUNCH class gave her the support and knowledge she needed to get her product off the ground, and even after her graduation, she is still getting assistance and advice from LAUNCH leaders, she said.

“When I walked through those doors [for the LAUNCH class], I had an idea and a hope,” she said. “When I graduated, I had a prototype, media exposure and a newfound recognition of what my potential could be.”

She encouraged anyone with an idea to take advantage of the class, which also helped bring her out of her introverted shell. She also found strength and encouragement from her classmates, she said.

“If you’re passionate about something, [LAUNCH leaders] will make you more passionate tenfold,” she said.
“[The other students] get invested in your idea. You become a family.”

This story was originally published on Nooga.com.

Yarn bombing: Finding Yarn Cozies in the Darnedest Places

Olga de Klein is on a journey. From painting to drawing, photography and, most recently, yarn bombing, de Klein thrives on being creative.

Though the 69-year-old says she never knows which direction her creativity will take her, she was pleasantly surprised that her yarn bombing project is being showcased on a nationally televised FedEx TV commercial airing this holiday season.

Yarn bombing is “the act of crocheting and knitting unexpected pieces for public display,” de Klein says. “It was started to cover/brighten up insipid concrete and metal structures in urban living. “

In the commercial, a grandmother is talking to her daughter on the phone, asking if she received the “toaster cozy” shipped through FedEx. The daughter says “yes,” and the camera shows the husband putting a huge cozy on the Christmas tree as well as several other objects covered by cozies. The last shot is a boy covered completely by a cozy and asking, “Is that Nana?”

Yarn bombing was started in Texas in 2005 by Magda Sayeg, who is considered to be the mother of the unusual art project, de Klein says.

“I had seen her work online and included it in my senior presentation at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga about the history of knitting. One of the things I touched on was what all you could do with yarn, which lead into ‘yarn bombing,'” she says.

In April 2012, de Klein yarn bombed trees in front of the Tennessee Aquarium. The “bombing” was part of MakeWorks 10 x 10 project, de Klein says. Last February, she struck again.

“I knit it (cozies) loosely for the trees so the trees could breathe,” she says. “Most of the time, the rough areas of bark keep the yarn in place. When I put it on smooth poles, it is secured in a way it does not slide down.”

122913e_Yarn_Bomber1_3col_clr_t240“I did the trolley on one of the walls at Glass Street for their Better Block event. The trolley is 32 feet wide and 15 feet high.” It’s still covered in yarn today.

But bombing is not the only use for yarn, she says, and it also shows up in her mixed media works, which are on display at Studio 3K at WorkSpace in downtown Chattanooga.

“It is a different way of feeling creative with yarn. The yarn I get is not your typical ‘grandmother’s’ yarn,” de Klein says. “It is very colorful, varied in texture, sometimes chiffon, sometimes silk, and most of it is strips stitched together by women in India and Nepal. They either collect remnants from fabric in factories where they make saris, so it does not end up in the landfill, or are from old saris. With the proceeds, they pay for the schooling of their children.”

She purchases the majority of her yarn from the DarnGoodYarn website, she says. “The owner of the business, Nicole Snow, has helped me in all my yarn-bomb endeavors, and always came through when I had to place a frantic call for more and/or different colors of yarn, texture, etc.,” she says.

It was de her connection with Snow that lead to her participation in the commercial, de Klein explains. Last October, Snow received a grant from the FedEx Small Business Competition that landed their yarn art in the commercial.

“I could not do all this by myself in less than a week, but Nicole had team of knitters who helped as well. Nicole called back, asking me to help her pull it all together and five days later I was on a plane to Los Angeles, where I arrived around the same time as Nicole, both armed with suitcases full of cozies.

“We fitted all the items — refrigerator door, toaster, dog, Christmas tree, an outside topiary. We only had to adjust the cozy for Fritz, the dog, which was a little too big on him.”

A native of the Netherlands, de Klein moved to America in 1967 and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting and drawing at UTC in 2011. Her grandmother taught her to knit.

“I stopped knitting for many years but took it up again after Adrian (her youngest son) died, and I knitted one scarf after the other, mindlessly, as it took me away from that cutting pain,” she says. “Then, when it was time for my senior project at UTC, and I wanted to get away from doing the same thing, I decided to ‘paint’ with yarn and it has been like that ever since.”

This story originally was published on Chattanooga Now.