Tiana Saul

Tiana Saul remembers being gifted with a jewelry set at six years old. The set included precious beads and nice stones. At the age of ten she learned from her parents how to wire wrap, and she has been making jewelry ever since. sayuridesigns1

Saul, originally from California, has collected small vintage novelties pretty much her whole life. Drawing from classic styles and vintage aesthetics, she designs and creates one of a kind accessories for men and women. Her business, Sayuri Designs, has been going strong for the past eight years.

What brought Saul to Chattanooga, a little over a year ago, was the promise of change and a more readily available use of the resources around her. “Chattanooga and surrounding areas are full of Antique shops and precious novelties that have been collected for generations,” she says. “I utilize antique, reclaimed,and deadstock materials as much as possible, so that each piece is handmade and one of a kind.”306f

Heavily influenced by the materials themselves, Saul is always excited to explore how her art and style can develop and expand. Every piece tells a story; the tarnished metal, a missing rhinestone, or a corner chip are all a part of its unique history. By incorporating these pieces into her own work, she gives them new life – extending their histories by including them in our own.

Saul has been apart of Chattanooga Workspace for about a year. This is her first time having a devoted workspace for her business and she looks forward to seeing where it takes her.sayuridesigns3

Apart from Workspace, she also participates in Chattanooga Market each weekend, where individuals come to see her unique pieces. “I try to fill my booth as much as possible so that there is something for everyone. Each piece of jewelry looks different and there is a style for everyone.”

You can also see Saul’s jewelry on her etsy account sayuridesigns and her Facebook tiana.sayuri.designs.

Kevin Bate

Kevin Bate moved to Chattanooga in 1994. He had flirted with a career in art a few times (bought it drinks, took it out on Valentine’s Day, etc.) but was never quite able to commit to it.

In 2011, all of that changed. Married with a newborn, Kevin decided (for some crazy reason) that this was the perfect time to attempt another launch of his art career. One afternoon while his infant son was sleeping, Kevin snuck out to the shed to look for art supplies. What he found instead was plywood, house paint and one inch brushes.

Understandably, his first paintings were quite large. This is probably why he jumped so quickly to murals. Since then, his works have appeared everywhere from Highland Park, MLK Blvd, the North Shore and venues such as Track 29.

Kevin has just completed The Fallen Five Mural, a memorial to the victims of the July 16, 2015 shootings in Chattanooga. It is part of The McCallie Walls Project, a neighborhood beautification and paying-artists-a-living-wage-for-their-work project that he curates. Lately, he has sent fan mail to Chuck Close and received props on Instagram from reluctant Chattanooga native, Usher.

Jenny Shugart: Site Seeing Photography

 

Jenny Shugart remembers always having a camera, but didn’t realize how much she loves shooting photos until taking a photography class in graduate architecture school. She says: “I am usually drawn to objects – structures, bridges, details, old rusted stuff. Occasionally the objects are arranged in such a way as to create a space or pattern that also needs to be captured. These objects, spaces and patterns have a quality and substance that seem to ask to be photographed. They call out to be noticed…to be seen, if only in a particular moment. I don’t do portraiture of people (they move and talk back – objects don’t). But, I consider my photographs to be a form of portraiture…a way of seeing every day life or every day objects, past or present. I hope my photographs stir a memory of something or creates a desire to travel outside the usual boundaries – to inspire the observer to pursue his or her own adventures throughout the world…and throughout daily life.”

Her photography work has been in various solo and group art shows as well as purchased for individual collections and by companies for their decor. Except for digitizing black & white negatives and cropping a photo for a particular size, Jenny doesn’t manipulate her photographs…you see what she saw.

When she isn’t busy with her photography, Jenny also enjoys passing the time with knitting, fabric projects and collage work.

Brandy Burgans

 

Brandy Burgans is a Chattanooga native, mixed media artist, and sole tattoo artist and founder of Blade & Banner, an upscale private tattoo studio. “It has always been a goal for me to provide my clientele with their own personal and private one-on-one experience. Tattooing is an intimate process, and spending time with someone who wants to wear your artwork should be a discreet and special experience for them.”

She loves doing bold and bright color tattoos, stippled and black tattoos, painted-style tattoo work, and as of lately she has really enjoyed recreating master works from Chagall to Picasso on skin. You can find out more about Brandy and her work at www.brandyburgans.com.

Studio 2B also houses Brandy’s art studio. When she’s not tattooing she’s working on commissioned original mixed media visual art. She studied art privately from the age of seven throughout college, and her thirst for knowledge, new techniques, and new instruction sends her all over the world annually.

Roses Taylor — To Capture a Glimpse of the Uniqueness

Roses Taylor found her love of sculpture after an exploration of many other art forms.  She is an accomplished musician, dancer, painter, and actor while continuing her practice as a  professional counselor and marriage and family therapist.  She is wife, mother, grandmother, and an “animal whisperer.” She brings to her work the influences from the depths of her experiences in all of these areas.
Internationally known masters under whom Roses has studied include Aldo Casanova, Stanley Bleifeld, Leonda Finke, Tuck Langland, and Dan Ostermiller (current head of National Sculpture Society).  Her ability to get a likeness of her subject has been an innate gift that is valued by her customers.  In addition to portraiture Roses enjoys free form sculpture as well as sculpting nature.  She works closely with her foundry using the traditional European lost wax process and is carefully involved through each step of this complicated procedure from modeling the clay, working the wax, to finding the right patina for each bronze casting.  Roses uses not only her own eye and skill to achieve a likeness of her subject, but she also involves family and friends of the subject, particularly when commissioned to sculpt a deceased loved one.  Roses’ goal in her work is to capture a glimpse of the uniqueness of each subject and to convey the spirit of the individual character to the viewer.
Roses can bring your vision to life. She is skilled at creating a wide range of artistic pieces, including:
  • Portrait sculpture
  • Figurative sculpture
  • Garden sculpture
  • Monument
  • Commemorative Medal
  • Commemorative Plaque
  • Bas Relief