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Claudia Moore

Coming from military family, Claudia Moore got to experience different parts of the world from a young age. But it was when she attended the University of Kansas that she found her passion for Fine Art. 

12316415_193153167694432_6804039321562852923_nWith a modern impressionism style, Moore finds inspiration in water and nature. She focuses more on landscapes than anything else. Most pieces seen in her studio are of boats and water scenes.

“I am fortunate to be able to do what I love for fun,” says Moore. “Painting is a constant learning process. You can take the same scene and make it look completely different by using different tools or different techniques. That’s why I love art.”

12316555_193153294361086_8755616979145436242_nMoore has been apart of Chattanooga Workspace for the past two years, and also finds inspiration in the artists around her.

“Workspace is such a good community,” she says. “That’s one of the reasons why I am here. We learn through each other, we collaborate with each other, it’s just a great place to be.”

To add one of Claudia Moore’s paintings to your collection please contact her through her studio at Chattanooga Workspace.

Colleen Williams

waterbearer-iiSeveral years ago, I began collecting vintage produce label art; the colors, patterns and designs used to identify product and brand would keep me visually interested for more time than was necessary, as each label was a beautiful balance between image and text. My partner, Nestor Valdes, was equally inspired by these small works of art and at my suggestion began to paint canvases and floor cloths with his own compositions as a way to connect with a simpler time.

Having relocated to Chattanooga within the year, my initial idea for a show theme had something to do with the river and its associations, since it was the main reason we chose this city over all others. However, it quickly became apparent that these re-imagined label art paintings were making us happy in the studio. With all of the uncertainty going on with the world at large, we believe viewing original art which harkens back to a bygone era of a less complicated America may provide a brief respite,

web-set-of-minis“I Am Not A Label” may be interpreted literally, as the work in the exhibit neither identifies a current product item nor brand even though compositional elements are mimicked. The title also has additional meanings which are close to my heart. Often, ceramic work is reduced to its function, whether it be bowl, cup, vase, etc. It is my hope that these labels are of secondary importance. Lastly, wherever the art-making journey takes us, both Nestor and I have experienced very circuitous paths as artists (Nestor, from ballet and Colleen, from architecture) which defy any label.

Kory Russell

I was never one for art growing up.  I wasn’t the kid that sits around and sketches during school.  I never tried to stand out from others by developing my own sense of high fashion, though I did some serious pleading for some British Knights when I was 12 (and my loving mom bought them-I’m sure against her better wisdom.)  

I took a passing interest in art only if I could get something for it in return; that is to say if chocolate was involved.  I won some chocolate when I drew a rabbit for Christmas in 2nd grade.  I won some more chocolate for drawing a flower in 3rd grade. My brother and I won some chocolate (and maybe a football) when we created a kite in a local art competition.

I entered art school at the University of Georgia because I was tired of studying chemistry, math, and geology, and knew I could at least draw a rabbit and a flower fairly well.

When I left art school, I left art behind, unless it could again get me something in return. I credit art for helping me land my beautiful wife.  I designed and cast her ring.  

I began to finally enjoy art about a year ago in 2015. I still don’t understand much of the art that is in the world, but I can get possessed and entranced by my own.  I can’t sleep most nights because my mind is creating new images, projects and means of creating.

I am still developing my style, but a consistent focus of mine is on expression and intent; coming from a state of mind that seeks to understand my subject matter, place, or time.  I enjoy creating moods that leave the viewer slightly uneasy; i.e., vibrant colors with fearful energy through brushstrokes, dark solemn colors with graphic cartoon-like characteristics in the lines.  I feel that this unease (though ensuring only the slightest unease is extremely important) encourages the viewer to take time with a painting, create their own story, and make the painting their own.